Digestive Care Expert Brenda Watson

TAG | Probiotics

One out of every three adults has high blood pressure (hypertension), yet only about half of them have their blood pressure under control. Another one out of three adults has prehypertension, which means that they are on their well on their way to joining the first group. With two-thirds of American adults suffering from hypertension or prehypertension, the search is on for effective ways to lower blood pressure.

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis published in the American Medical Association journal Hypertension found that probiotics are an effective means of lowering blood pressure. The researchers analyzed nine studies that included 543 participants and found that probiotic consumption lowered systolic blood pressure by 3.56 and diastolic blood pressure by 2.38 mm Hg when compared to those adults who did not take probiotics.

The blood pressure lowering effects were even stronger in people taking higher doses of probiotics and when they were taken for a period of at least eight weeks. They also found greater effect from consuming multiple rather than single strains of probiotics. These findings suggest that taking a high-dose, multi-strain probiotic for a longer duration is more effective at lowering blood pressure.

“We believe probiotics might help lower blood pressure by having other positive effects on health, including improving total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol; reducing blood glucose and insulin resistance; and by helping to regulate the hormone system that regulates blood pressure and fluid balance,” stated Jing Sun, PhD, lead researcher.

The reduction of blood pressure in this analysis, although modest, is similar to that found in another analysis of salt reduction of 2,000 mg daily. Even modest blood pressure reductions are beneficial, however, and have been associated with a 22 percent reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, or stroke.

The benefits of probiotics for conditions outside the gut are growing at a rapid pace. This new analysis is excellent evidence that what happens in your gut affects the rest of your body. Keep taking your probiotics.

high blood pressure, hypertension, multi-strain probiotics, Probiotics

On average, children in the United States develop six respiratory tract infections each year. Another infection—gastroenteritis, also known as the stomach flu—accounts for over 1.5 million outpatients visits, 200,000 hospital visits, and about 300 deaths each year. Together, these infections account for a considerable degree of illness in children. If you are a parent, you are familiar with the frequency of these conditions during childhood.

The search continues for therapies that will reduce these childhood infections. A recent review published in the journal Nutrition Reviews highlights a potential answer for children under two.

The authors conclude that the evidence “suggests that preventive use of prebiotics decreases the rate of infections requiring antibiotic therapy in infants and children aged 0–24 months.”

Prebiotics are non-digestible fibers that promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the intestines.

The researchers also state that prebiotics may be an effective preventive treatment for decreasing the rate of overall infections in these children. The prebiotics used in the studies include oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), fructans, inulin, and oligofrutose.

Interestingly, the researchers were unable to find studies using prebiotics to prevent infections in children over the age of two. They suggest such studies be undertaken, since older children are commonly introduced to new environments in which they are exposed to acute infections.

I recently blogged about a meta-analysis that found beneficial effects of probiotics for the treatment and prevention of cold and flu in children. Together, these two papers give us strong evidence that gut microbes have a major effect on our children’s immune health both in and out of the digestive system.

When taken together, probiotics and prebiotics pack a powerful punch. There is a synergistic effect between the two. Fortunately, you can eat foods high in the prebiotic inulin. Chicory root, Jerusalem artichoke, leeks, onions, garlic, and bananas all contain high amounts. A probiotic supplement plus prebiotic foods is a great combination to help maintain a healthy balance bacteria in your gut.

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Until recently, it was thought that the bladder—and therefore urine—is sterile, meaning that, in a healthy state, no bacteria live there. But a new study presented by researchers at the General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology is changing how scientists view the urinary system.

Using an expanded culture technique able to detect bacteria that standard techniques do not, they found that urine from healthy women does, in fact, contain bacteria.

“Doctors have been trained to believe that urine is germ-free,” noted Linda Brubaker, MD, MS, one of the researchers. “These findings challenge that notion, so this research opens the door to exciting new possibilities for patient treatment.”

They found that the bacteria in urine of women with an overactive bladder (OAB) differs from that of healthy women.

“The presence of certain bacteria in women with overactive bladder may contribute to OAB symptoms,” noted lead investigator, Evann Hilt.

Could changing the balance of bacteria in the urinary system improve symptoms of overactive bladder? Scientists will next look at which bacteria are helpful and which are harmful, and whether certain bacteria trigger the development of overactive bladder as well as other urinary tract conditions. With this information, they will better be able to treat this condition. They may find that by altering the bacteria in the urinary system, they can improve symptoms of overactive bladder. There may one day be a probiotic specifically for this condition. I am sure there are many women out there crossing their legs and nodding, yes!

The results of this study are not surprising to me, since I have known for a while that probiotics can have a positive effect on urinary health. The mechanism of this benefit is not fully understood, but it seems to me that it must involve communication between bacteria within the urinary system. I will be interested to see how this research unfolds as scientists further explore the human microbiome. My hunch is that they will find bacteria in more areas of the body they previously thought did not contain microbes.

bacteria, bladder, human microbiome, overactive bladder, Probiotics, urinary health, urine, women

Malnutrition (severe or moderate acute malnutrition) affects 23 percent of children in developing countries.1 The World Health Organization estimates that malnutrition is the cause of one-third of all child deaths.2 Malnutrition, or inadequate nutrition, manifests most noticeably as delayed growth, but also includes deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and protein.

A recently developed intervention for severe acute malnutrition, known as Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food, is currently being distributed to hundreds of thousands of children in the developing world. Other food interventions, such as a lentil and rice dish called khichuri-halwa, are being utilized. A recent study published in the journal Nature sought to understand whether the development of gut bacteria during infancy was associated with improvements in malnutrition after such interventions in Bangladeshi children.3

The researchers first tested the stool of healthy Bangladeshi children on a monthly basis during the first two years of life to determine the healthy development of gut bacteria. That is, they used these findings as a benchmark of a normally maturing gut bacterial community. After all, the first two to three years of life see some of the biggest changes in gut bacterial composition, and by this age, the gut microbes resemble that of an adult.

Next, they tested the gut bacteria of children with severe and moderate acute malnutrition before, during, and after receiving either the Therapeutic Food or the lentil and rice dish. Before the interventions, gut bacteria was found to be immature—that is, the gut microbes were found were not fully developed as they were in healthy children. After the food interventions, the children’s gut microbiota immaturity was only partially improved—and temporarily, at that. By four months after the interventions had ceased, their gut microbes reverted back to their original, immature state.

The researchers suggest that either a longer food intervention or a different food that more resembles the children’s native diet is needed. They also recommend “next-generation probiotics using gut-derived taxa [groups],” which I believe will have the best impact. What if they isolated the gut microbes from the healthy children and gave them to the malnourished children? Those microbes would take up residence in the children’s guts, especially if the children were also given a food that those bacteria naturally thrive on.

Aside from lack of food, gastrointestinal (GI) infection is another cause of malnutrition. During a GI infection, the immune system is taxed in such a way that a broad range of nutrients are required to fight the pathogenic organism. Let’s not forget that a healthy gut microbiota can help ward off such infections in the first place—and can help improve the body’s nutrient capacity. You see, gut microbes play an important role in the harvest of nutrients from food. They help to break down food so that the body can efficiently absorb the nutrients it needs. When the community of gut microbes is not a healthy one, the ability to absorb nutrients adequately is compromised. When this occurs during infancy along with a lack of food or an infection, malnutrition can be worsened.

I cannot overemphasize the importance of developing a healthy gut balance during infancy. Avoiding medically unnecessary Cesarean sections and antibiotics during pregnancy (and during infancy for baby), breastfeeding for at least one year (more is better), and taking probiotics during and after pregnancy along with eating fermented foods is the best way to set infants up with a healthy balance of gut microbes, both in developing countries and here at home.

References

1. Lazzerini M, Rubert L, and Pani P, “Specially formulated foods for treating children with moderate acute malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries.” Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Jun 21;6:CD009584.
2. http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/topics/child/malnutrition/en/ Accessed 6/19/2014.
3. Subramanian A, Huq S, Yatsunenko T, et al., “Persistent gut microbiota immaturity in malnourished Bangladeshi children.” Nature. 2014 Jun 4.

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Probiotics, or beneficial bacteria, have been studied for a number of health conditions, but one of the most exciting benefits of probiotics is their effect on the common cold. A number of studies have looked at probiotic treatment and prevention of upper respiratory tract infections (cold and flu, most notably). A recent systematic review evaluated data from twelve randomized, controlled trials in children and adults and found that those people who had taken Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium probiotics experienced fewer days of illness, shorter illness episodes, and fewer days absent from daycare, school, or work when compared to those participants who took a placebo.

“This paper shows that with the addition of live lactobacilli and bifidobacteria to your diet, the duration of upper respiratory tract infections (e.g. colds) could be shortened,” stated Sarah King, PhD. “Combined with results from a 2011 meta-analysis published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, which demonstrated that probiotics can reduce the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections, the implications of these findings are significant and could translate into cost savings and quality of life improvements.” The economic impact of colds is estimated to cost the United States $40 billion each year, so any reduction in the common cold is welcome.

Probiotics impact the immune system in a number of ways. Up to 80 percent of the immune system resides in the gut. The gut bacteria help to educate the immune system so that it responds appropriately. So it’s no wonder that probiotics have a beneficial effect on the respiratory tract.

 

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Clinical studies continue to link chronic, low-grade inflammation—also known as silent inflammation—with a growing number of health conditions and diseases. Because it can be present without being felt, this type of inflammation is particularly dangerous and can be harmful to the body over time.

Recently, a team of scientists from Texas A&M University found a link between our internal “body clocks” and the inflammatory response tied to metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. It has to do with immune cells called macrophages, which control inflammatory response. Study results involving mice showed that a high-fat diet and irregular sleep disrupts the natural rhythms of our cells and tissues, which in turn triggers inflammation, fat accumulation, and ultimately insulin resistance—creating a vicious cycle.

“To promote human health, we need not only to eat healthy foods, but also more importantly to keep a healthy lifestyle, which includes avoiding sleeping late and eating at night,” said Dr. David Earnest, Texas A&M professor and one of the study’s lead authors. Here are four simple ways you can change your diet to help reduce the risk of inflammation and metabolic disorders:

  • Partner with Probiotics: In clinical studies, daily supplementation with a high-potency probiotic has been shown to support the healthy function of white blood cells and help reduce the risk of inflammation-associated metabolic disorders.‡
  • Add More Omega-3s: The Omega-3s that come from fish oil—specifically EPA and DHA—are particularly good at helping to prevent silent inflammation, in part by helping to balance out the inflammatory effects of the Omega-6 fats found in high amounts in the Standard American Diet (SAD).‡
  • Don’t Forget the Fiber: If you aren’t eating enough fiber, the good bacteria in your gut may not be able to produce enough protective short-chain fatty acids.‡ This can lead to inflammation as the immune system responds inappropriately to healthy gut microbes and treats them as harmful bacteria. Aim for at least 35 grams of fiber daily.
  • Load up on Antioxidants: Antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables target free radicals in the body, which can damage cells and tissues and trigger inflammation. Opt for low-sugar fruits such as blueberries, raspberries, pomegranates, plums and cherries, along with non-starchy veggies such as kale, spinach, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. Olive oil, raw nuts and nut butters are also a good source of antioxidants.

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In case you missed it, a recent episode of the Hallmark Channel daytime talk show Home & Family featured a topic I’m pretty passionate about… probiotics! Hosts Mark Steines and Cristina Ferrare talked to renowned nutrition specialist Dr. Melina Jampolis, who shared with viewers some important facts about probiotics—including what to look for in an effective probiotic supplement.

Her advice to viewers included adding more probiotic foods and supplements to the daily diet to help maintain digestive balance and promote immune health, and during the segment she pointed out that Ultimate Flora probiotics from ReNew Life are an excellent choice when it comes to selecting a high-potency probiotic supplement because they meet key criteria: high culture count, multiple strains of bacteria, delayed release capsules and guaranteed potency.

The episode called attention to the fact that there are literally trillions of bacteria in the human digestive tract (roughly ten times more than human cells) and how a shift in the balance of good (and neutral) to harmful bacteria in the gut can have a significant impact on our digestive health as well as the health of the whole body—something I talk about at length in my book and PBS show The Heart of Perfect Health.

Be sure to tune in if you missed it!

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In some parts of the country (especially here in Florida where I live) allergy season is in full swing. So many people are suffering with congested sinuses, stuffy noses, and feeling like, well, not so great. Over 11 million people in the United States are diagnosed with allergic rhinitis, or hay fever—what most people simply call allergies—each year. I am sure there are many more people who do not get officially diagnosed, adding to this staggering number.

A recent study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that people taking the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei daily for five weeks in addition to their usual allergy medication had improved quality of life along with improved ocular symptoms (less watery, itchy, red, and swollen eyes). Improvement in specific nasal symptoms was not found, however.

“Probiotic foods or food supplements seem to be popular and widely used by subjects suffering from allergic rhinitis, however, a study under real-life conditions and in subjects receiving a medicinal treatment was needed,” noted the researchers. While they did find a benefit of the probiotic, more studies will be needed to determine whether the addition of other strains will increase the effect.

A number of probiotic strains have already been studied in people with allergic rhinitis, but most of them have been single strain studies with mixed results. Researchers have begun to look at multiple strain formulas for allergies, but we are still in the early stages of research. My hunch is that the multi-strain probiotic formulas will be more effective because they target a wider range of immune functions. I will keep you posted as I learn more.

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April is IBS Awareness Month—a time for individuals and communities across the country to spread awareness about irritable bowel syndrome and the millions of Americans it affects every day. Coast to coast, activities and events are in the works to help people understand this debilitating disorder, its signs and symptoms, and how it is diagnosed and treated.

Quick Facts about IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome affects between 25 and 45 million Americans every day. Although its cause is still unknown, many experts believe the symptoms of IBS—which include abdominal pain and bloating along with diarrhea, constipation or both—are closely linked to the interaction between the gut, brain, and central nervous system. (It’s possible the nerves along the gut alter normal pain perception so that the bowel becomes oversensitive to normal stimuli.)

If you or someone you know is living with IBS, here are 9 natural solutions to help you take the first steps toward better bowel health:

1.     Add More Fiber. In addition to its role in heart health and weight management, fiber supports healthy digestive function by helping to absorb and eliminate toxins in the colon that may contribute to IBS symptoms.

2.     Limit Fatty Foods. Eating foods that are high in fat such as fried foods and certain meats may contribute to IBS. Be sure to consume these types of foods in moderation.

3.     Cut Back on Caffeine. Highly caffeinated foods and beverages (such as coffee, tea, soda and chocolate) have been shown to worsen IBS symptoms.

4.     Avoid Foods High in Sulfur. Some foods that are healthy—including vegetables such as brussels sprouts, cabbage, garlic, onions and broccoli—are high in sulfur and may actually trigger IBS symptoms. Opt for low-sulfur veggies such as carrots or green beans.

5.     You May Have a Food Sensitivity. Some people have IBS because they are dealing with an underlying food sensitivity. Gluten and dairy are the two most common foods to which a sensitivity may develop. A gluten-free diet, dairy-free diet, or both can help to improve IBS symptoms in these people.

6.     Show Your Digestive Tract a Little TLC. Many herbs and nutraceuticals such as marshmallow root, slippery elm, and the amino acid L-glutamine can help nourish and soothe the intestinal tract and bowel.

7.     Balance with Probiotics. Probiotics are the beneficial bacteria in the gut that work to maintain a balanced internal environment and promote optimal digestion and immune health.

8.     Drink Plenty of Water. Drinking plenty of water (at least half your body weight in ounces every day) will help flush out toxins and other harmful microbes that may be causing IBS symptoms.

9.     Try Colon Hydrotherapy. IBS sufferers—especially those with severe symptoms—may find that natural colon hydrotherapy can help cleanse the system and improve digestive health and elimination.

Learn More about IBS with the New Mobile App!

The International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD), which first designated April as IBS Awareness Month back in 1997, just launched a new mobile app (for iOS and Android platforms) to help people learn more about IBS, its symptoms and treatment options. The free app is called IBS Info and offers real-time information from experts in the gastrointestinal field to promote awareness and education about irritable bowel syndrome. Be sure to check it out!

The more we study and understand, the closer we come to helping millions of IBS sufferers live healthier, happier lives—so help me spread the word this month and all year long!

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No, it isn’t the latest joke, though chances are you have heard the story in the news. But let me just clear something up: there is no actual poop in a new type of “gourmet” sausage developed recently by scientists in Spain—just a beneficial strain of bacteria commonly found in (you guessed it!) baby poop.

For those of us with the inside scoop on poop, it actually makes perfect sense. Food microbiologist and co-author of the study Anna Jofré explained in a recent interview that the two kinds of bacteria used most often in probiotics, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, are far more abundant in infant poop than in adult excrement. Not only that, said Jofré, but they are easy to obtain.

Jofré and her colleagues at the Institute for Research and Technology in Food and Agriculture collected 43 infant fecal samples, from which they isolated three strains of beneficial bacteria. They used those bacteria to create several batches of sausage, and what they found was pretty interesting.

Of the three strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus—a strain commonly found in yogurt and probiotic supplements—became the dominant strain, multiplying to levels of 100 million cells per gram, enough to begin to promote health benefits said Jofré and her team. And as for the taste? “We ate them, and they tasted very good,” said Jofré. (They were even a bit healthier than most types of sausage made in the region, with less fat and salt.)

Of course, right about now you may be asking… Why make sausage with baby poop bacteria in the first place? Well, according to Jofré, probiotic fermented sausages will offer consumers yet another way to include probiotics in their diet, especially for those who are lactose intolerant and can’t eat dairy products.

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