Digestive Care Expert Brenda Watson

Probiotics - Transient or Gut Colonizing

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Probiotics - Transient or Gut Colonizing
August 20, 2012
12:22 pm
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bwatson
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March 4, 2009
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Dear David,

Thanks for writing!

We've done extensive research on probiotics for years and years at Renew Life, the company my husband and I founded. We offer probiotics, both in capsules and also powdered form. Here's a post regarding probiotics I think you may find interesting - http://blog.brendawatson.com/f…..probiotic/. This is not necessarily what you may read in other places, but it's completely supported by peer-review journal research and we have multitudes of testimonials that support these suggestions.

One issue with yogurt is that there just aren't very many cultures available there. Many yogurts contain sugars, which defeat the purpose of balancing the gut (bad bacteria and yeast thrive on sugar). Kefir can be a good source of probiotics (depends again on many factors), and there are some strains of probiotic, regardless of origin, that are more beneficial than others for each person. Everyone has their own "bacterial footprint" which means the strains that might be best for you might not be the best for me. With regard to yogurt or some forms of kefir, a person may even have a sensitivity to dairy – so each time they would eat the yogurt, they might be creating additional inflammation, which isn't the way to repopulate the gut!

Additionally, when you consider rebuilding your good bacteria defenses, you can't look at probiotics alone because they don't operate alone. You also need to consider prebiotics (soluble fiber which turns to short chain fatty acids – you can think of prebiotics as food for the probiotics in a way, helping to stabilize internal pH, and they also absorb toxins), and you need to consider how much damage you're dealing with in the intestinal lining (possible Candida overgrowth, bacterial dysbiosis). You may need to repair and rebuild the lining so the probiotics can function as they're meant to, using a product that contains something like Renew Life Intestinew, which contains L-glutamine, which research has shown to benefit the gut lining. Otherwise, yes, the probiotics will be transient (nothing to hang onto, in a sense). And back to sensitivities, if a person continues to eat foods that are irritating, it will be very difficult to create an environment of healing and rebuilding.

I truly don't mean to confuse you further. I just want you to be aware that creating digestive health is a lifestyle. 80% has to do with your eating habits. Your probiotics, omega oils, fibers, enzymes all align to create a total environment in your gut that gives your digestion and immune system the best support available. http://www.renewlife.com/learn…..all-health

If you'd like to contact my assistant at jsinclaire@renewlife.com, she'll email you the chapter on Leaky Gut from my most recent book which contains some interesting illustrations of what I've been describing.

I hope this helps.

Brenda Watson

August 17, 2012
2:35 pm
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dlebar
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June 27, 2011
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Hello Brenda,

 

I wanted to know your opinion on taking probiotics in the form of capsules, powders, yogurts, etc.  I have read in many places that this type of good bacteria is not going to colonize the human gut lining and is only transient.  Transient meaning that it's beneficial while in the gut, but once expelled needs to be replenished.

 

Some sources say that homemade Kefir has the ability to colonize the gut lining but yogurt does not.  I'm a little confused.

 

I also found this yogurt starter that claims to be of human origin. Does this give it a better chance of colonizing the gut lining?

 

Is it the type of bacteria that cannot colonize the human gut lining? ie. Bovine Origin?

 

Any answers to clear the confusion would be very much appreciated.

 

- David

Toronto, Ontario

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